PORT PHILLIP BAY


Narrow Snapping Shrimp 

Alpheus astrinx Banner & Banner, 1982

View scientific description and taxonomy

Scientific Details

Rostrum well developed and continued posteriorly as carina. Rostrum a little longer than broad at base, separated from orbital hoods by broad grooves; orbital hoods with broad teeth, one-third as long as rostrum; rostrum-hood margins continuous. Chelipeds markedly asymmetrical, larger one swollen, carried extended, dactylus with plunger fitting into socket at base of fixed finger. Large chela laterally compressed; lower margin barely concave; upper margin almost straight; with strong acute lateral and mesial teeth near dactylar articulation; propodus with weak longitudinal ridges, lateral one terminating at tooth; with only scattered setae. Smaller cheliped with fingers simple, not of balaeniceps form. Pereopods 1-4 with epipods. Pleuron of abdominal somite 6 without an articulating posterior triangular plate.

Source: Poore, G.C.B. (2004) Marine decapod Crustacea of southern Australia. A guide to identification (with chapter on Stomatopoda by Shane Ahyong). CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne, 574 pp.

Taxonomy

Phylum:
Arthropoda
Subphylum:
Crustacea
Class:
Malacostraca
Subclass:
Eumalacostraca
Superorder:
Eucarida
Order:
Decapoda
Suborder:
Pleocyemata
Infraorder:
Caridea
Family:
Alpheidae
Genus:
Alpheus
Species:
astrinx

General Description

Rostrum a little longer than broad at base, separated from orbital hoods by broad grooves; orbital hoods with broad teeth, one-third as long as rostrum; rostrum-hood margins continuous. Large claw (chela) laterally compressed; lower margin barely concave; upper margin almost straight; with strong acute lateral and mesial teeth near dactylar articulation; sixth segment (propodus) with weak longitudinal ridges, lateral one terminating at tooth; with only scattered setae. Small chela not of balaeniceps form. Bold bright red longitudinal stripes. Rare in Victorian waters. Up to 4.5 cm long.

Biology

Snapping shrimps or pistol shrimps are immediately distinguished by having one claw much larger than the other, the larger claw cylindrical and with a parrot-beak-like finger. The Narrow Snapping shrimp is so named because the large claw is laterally compressed. The shrimp usually lives in pairs, often in the burrow made by the file shell, Limatula strangei, a bivalve said to be distasteful to fish.

Habitat

Subtidal in reef, to depths of 5 m.

Reefs

Distribution guide

Southern temperate oceans, including southern Australia.

Species Group

Prawns, shrimps, lobsters Shrimps

Depth

Shallow (1-30 m)

Water Column

On or near sea floor

Max Size

4.5 cm

Diet

Organic matter

Commercial Species

No

Global Dispersal

Recorded in Australia

Conservation Status

  • DSE Advisory List : Not listed
  • EPBC Act 1999 : Not listed
  • IUCN Red List : Not listed

Author

article author Taylor, J.

Dr. Jo Taylor is the Sciences Collections Online Coordinator at Museum Victoria.

Author

article author Poore, G.C.B.

Dr. Gary Poore is Principal Curator Emeritus at Museum Victoria.

citation

Cite this page as:
Taylor, J. & Poore, G.C.B., 2011, Narrow Snapping Shrimp, Alpheus astrinx, in Taxonomic Toolkit for marine life of Port Phillip Bay, Museum Victoria, accessed 19 Oct 2017, http://portphillipmarinelife.net.au:8098/species/5502

Text: creative commons cc by licence