PORT PHILLIP BAY


Brown Trout 

Salmo trutta Linnaeus, 1758

View scientific description and taxonomy

Scientific Details

Meristics.
Dorsal fin spines/rays: 12-15
Anal fin spines/rays: 10-12
Caudal fin rays: 19
Pectoral fin rays: 12-14
Ventral fin spines/rays: 9-10
Lateral line: 120-130
Gill rakers: 14-17

Interpreting fin count meristics.
Spines are in Roman numerals and soft rays are in Arabic numerals. Spines and rays that are continuous in one fin are separated by a comma. Fin sections are separated by semicolons.

Detailed descriptions of fin count and other meristics are in:
Gomon. M.F., Bray, D.J. & Kuiter, R.H. (eds) (2008) Fishes of Australia's Southern Coast. Sydney : Reed New Holland 928 pp.

Order level detail.
A small order of diadromous fishes with a single dorsal fin on the back, a small fleshy adipose fin near the tail base, abdominal pelvic fins, and pectoral fins placed low on the sides. To 1.5 m. Very important commercial and recreational fishes that have been introduced to many parts of the world.

Family level detail.
Body moderately deep to elongate, slightly compressed, covered in small scales with a single, short-based dorsal fin on the middle of the back, and a small fleshy adipose fin near the tail base.

Taxonomy

Phylum:
Chordata
Subphylum:
Craniata
Superclass:
Gnathostomata
Class:
Actinopterygii
Order:
Salmoniformes
Family:
Salmonidae
Genus:
Salmo
Species:
trutta

General Description

Body long, moderately deep, slightly compressed, tail base moderately deep, with a single short-based dorsal fin on the middle of the back, and a small fleshy adipose fin far back on the body. Last anal-fin ray pressed back against body in adults. Pelvic fins abdominal, pectoral fins low on sides. Mouth large reaching beyond eye, jaws with prominent teeth. Sea-run individuals are silvery with greyish back and faint dark spots, whereas those is in estuaries are silvery brown to brownish-green with obvious spots, both have black spots on the dorsal fin and a reddish-brown adipose fin. To 1.4 m, usually 40-90 cm, and a weigh of 23 kg.

Biology

Although salmonids are native to Northern Hemisphere waters, these popular angling and food fishes have been introduced to many parts of the world. Large mature trout, escapees from stocked populations and sea-cage fish farms, are occasionally found in estuaries and coastal waters.

Habitat

Occasionally found in estuarine and shallow coastal waters as adults.

Open water

Species Group

Fishes Trouts

Depth

Shallow (1-30 m)

Water Column

On or near sea floor

Max Size

1.4 m

Commercial Species

No

Global Dispersal

Introduced to Australia

Conservation Status

  • DSE Advisory List : Not listed
  • EPBC Act 1999 : Not listed
  • IUCN Red List : Least Concern

Author

article author Bray, D.J.

Di Bray is a Senior Collection Manager of ichthyology at Museum Victoria.

Author

article author Gomon, M.F.

Dr. Martin Gomon is a Senior Curator of ichthyology at Museum Victoria.

citation

Cite this page as:
Bray, D.J. & Gomon, M.F., 2011, Brown Trout, Salmo trutta, in Taxonomic Toolkit for marine life of Port Phillip Bay, Museum Victoria, accessed 25 Mar 2017, http://portphillipmarinelife.net.au:8098/species/6488

Text: creative commons cc by licence