PORT PHILLIP BAY


Comb Jelly 

Unplaced species

Taxonomy

Ctenophora :
View scientific description and taxonomy

Scientific Details

These egg-shaped jellies are recognised by the iridescent narrow rows of beating hair-like cilia along their sides. When viewed in the water, the cilia may look like small rainbows as they reflect light. Two tentacles (retracted within the body when the animal is not feeding). Body usually 2-3 cm long.

Taxonomy

Phylum:
Ctenophora

General Description

These egg-shaped jellies are recognised by the iridescent narrow rows of beating hair-like cilia along their sides. When viewed in the water, the cilia may look like small rainbows as they reflect light. Two tentacles (retracted within the body when the animal is not feeding). Body usually 2-3 cm long.

Biology

These small animals occasionally drift into Port Phillip and wash ashore. There are several comb jelly species living in Victorian waters. Most of them are difficult to preserve and so can be difficult to identify. This species seen in Port Phillip may belong to the genus Pleurobrachia.

Habitat

Open water, to depth of 200 m.

Open water

Coastal shores

Distribution guide

Worldwide.

Species Group

Jellyfishes and allies Comb jellies

Depth

Shore (0-1 m)
Shallow (1-30 m)
Deep ( > 30 m)

Water Column

Surface Midwater

Max Size

2 cm

Diet

Carnivore

Harmful

Not known to be dangerous to humans.

Commercial Species

No

Global Dispersal

Recorded in Australia

Identify

Conservation Status

  • DSE Advisory List : Not listed
  • EPBC Act 1999 : Not listed
  • IUCN Red List : Not listed

Author

article author Browne, J.

Jo Browne is a consultant with expertise in ctenophore and cnidarian taxonomy.

citation

Cite this page as:
Browne, J., 2011, Comb Jelly, , in Taxonomic Toolkit for marine life of Port Phillip Bay, Museum Victoria, accessed 18 Oct 2017, http://portphillipmarinelife.net.au:8098/species/4203

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